reileen: (general - strawberry)
By now, everyone's probably heard about how in December, the White House "refused to accept the Environmental Protection Agency's conclusion that greenhouse gases are pollutants that must be controlled, telling agency officials that an e-mail message containing the document would not be opened". BushCo: Sterling examples of proper adult human conduct, aren't they? "LA LA LA LA LA I CAN'T HEAR YOU LA LA LA LA LA LA." I love it! It's practically a philosophy of Rovian genius, right up there with the 50%+1 approach to winning elections! [/sarcasm]

Therefore, I shall instead report on another shocking-but-not-really story that has come out about Mistah Shrub:
President Bush met with Filipino President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo today at the White House. Arroyo was in Washington while her country tries to recover from a typhoon that devastated coastal areas and flipped a ferry carrying over 800 passengers last week. Before discussing aide for the Philippines, Bush couldn't resist beginning the sober meeting with a quip about a Filipino member of his kitchen staff.
PRESIDENT BUSH: Madam President, it is a pleasure to welcome you back to the Oval Office. We have just had a very constructive dialogue. First, I want to tell you how proud I am to be the President of a nation that -- in which there's a lot of Philippine-Americans. They love America and they love their heritage. And I reminded the President that I am reminded of the great talent of the -- of our Philippine-Americans when I eat dinner at the White House. (Laughter.)

PRESIDENT ARROYO: Yes.

PRESIDENT BUSH: And the chef is a great person and a really good cook, by the way, Madam President.

PRESIDENT ARROYO: Thank you.




Yes, because clearly the greatest accomplishments of the Filipinos and the Filipino-Americans (which is the correct term, daghan kaayong salamat) can all be summed up in their cooking! Wow, way to totally not derail the stereotype of the Filipino maid, Mr. President! I would be applauding the extent of your ignorance and condescension if I weren't too busy facepalming repeatedly with both hands.

...okay, to be fair, we do have some awesome dishes, like chicken adobo and pancit and siopao and puto and a dessert called "food of the gods" which I unfortunately don't know the official name of and...okay, I'll stop now.

But seriously, what the shit is this? President Arroyo goes to the White House to request US aid and the first (only?) thing Bush can compliment her people and the descendants of her people on is what good servants they make for the 'Mericans? As Angry Asian Man said, it's like Bush thinks this is a country club. "Yeah, compliments to your Phillippine cook! Excellent adobe, by the way. What's that, you say? It's called adobo, not adobe? Well, it's close enough."

-Reileen
quo modo (shadow to light)
reileen: (Default)
(First read on Making Light. Also on Firedoglake.)

In response to Obama's overwhelmingly popular platform of change, the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) unveiled its new campaign slogan: "The Change You Deserve."

Barring all semantic issues with the phrase (ranging from images of fat cats tossing a nickel to a homeless person begging for change to the illogic of "wait, but your party's incumbent right now, so...?" and other such exercises of morbid imaginations), it's also problematic because the phrase is already being used to market the antidepressant Effexor:

The Change You Deserve™

Are these symptoms of depression interfering with your life?

  • Not involved with family and friends the way you used to be?
  • Low energy, fatigue?
  • Not motivated to do the things you once looked forward to doing?
  • Not feeling as good as you used to?

Not exactly inspiring, is it? Especially when you consider that the drug's been under a Black Box Warning for promoting suicidal tendencies since (oh, the irony) 2004.

-Reileen
there's no escaping because my fate is horror and doom
reileen: (Default)
From Daily Kos, by the inimitable, tireless, and courageous [livejournal.com profile] dogemperor: When the spiritual advisor of a presidential candidate (Republican John McCain) runs a church that pings nearly every item on at least four different respected "checklists for coercion" and is basically on the same level as or even worse than the churches run by Scientology or the Moonies, you have a BIG FUCKING PROBLEM.

Did you know that there are demons for handwriting analysis and anal fissures? No, seriously.

(If you're interested in finding out more, be sure to check out DE's main Daily Kos blog - he's posted a number of entries recently regarding the infiltration of one of John Hagee's church retreats by one of Rolling Stone's journalists. It's true that Taibbi's article has a bit of a snarky tone to it, but DE, who grew up in this type of atmosphere for at least 25 years before finally breaking away from it, was able to confirm Taibbi's observations about what went on at the retreat and what it did to people.)

***

I was out today with Melissa and Lauren for our usual "Beat-the-ACEN-mob-to-the-Pocky-and-other-snacks" trip to Mitsuwa Marketplace, a Japanese marketplace up on the North Side. Intrigued by Kagura's (from Gintama) fascination with sukonbu, I went and bought some, but it looks like I bought the konbu for making soup stock with, not the snack kind. Whoops. Well, now I have something I can possibly experiment with using my meager cooking skills.

Did you know that there are apple-flavored KitKats? No, seriously. I bought one. Haven't tasted it yet, though.

-Reileen
I remember when rock was young
reileen: (Default)
Guest contributor to Racialicious, Kate Harding, posts about racism fatigue and the issues that it brings up, with regards to responses to a racist cover for Vogue featuring LeBron Johnson and Giselle Bundchen.

I'm going to dump a long quote on y'all in a moment - I've tried to snip some parts, but insights are packed into nearly every sentence, so it was a bit hard to do. Nevertheless, here we go:

And it can be especially important to talk about the subtle things, because that’s where privilege reveals itself most clearly. Any white person who’s neither an idiot nor an asshole can see and deplore the racism in, say, this image. But we can’t all see it in the Vogue cover. So when we start talking about the Vogue cover as part of a long tradition of racist imagery that casts African-American men as aggressive apes, we get a much more useful conversation going. Instead of just a bunch of white liberals saying, “That’s horrible!” and a bunch of white supremacists saying, “No, it’s right on!” we get to see all the grey areas of privilege brought out in the open: those of us who try to be anti-racist and educate ourselves accordingly but still missed the racism there until it was pointed out to us; those of us who sorta see it once it’s pointed out but still think people are making a mountain out of a molehill; and most importantly, those of us who missed it in the first place and, on the basis of that, continue to insist it is not there.

We’ve been talking a lot around here recently about that last category of people, with regard to sexism. And as a woman and a feminist, I can tell you those people are FUCKING INFURIATING. The people who actually live as the subjects of discrimination and hatred are not oversensitive; we are sensitized to the more subtle manifestations of those things, because we’ve seen how they’re wielded against us, over and over and fucking over. So many people have trouble grokking the concept of “privilege” and will respond to having their own pointed out with laundry lists of the disadvantages they’ve experienced in their lives. But privilege, in this sense, is not just about obvious advantages. It is about the luxury of not seeing the subtle shit.

As a white person, I haven’t been sensitized to covert racism by a lifetime of experiences. Unlike a person of color who has no choice but to see and feel it every day, I actually do have to “go looking for it”; my privilege could otherwise allow me to go through life believing it doesn’t exist. Because I care about being anti-racist, I do go looking, do make an effort to educate myself about patterns of racism I wouldn’t automatically recognize–and to question myself when my kneejerk reaction is, “Oh, come on–I’m supposed to believe that’s racist?”

But because I’m white, I also have the option of not looking any time I don’t feel like it. That’s what privilege is. It’s the option to ignore nasty shit that doesn’t directly affect my own life, my career, my relationships, my bank account, my social standing, my housing situation, etc. And I won’t lie to you–I take that option plenty. [. . .] I spend most of my activism energy on feminist issues and fat issues, things that affect me directly.

And you know, I don’t even feel guilty about some of that. Each one of us can only do so much, and I’d wager most of us spend more energy on things that affect us directly than on things that don’t. Even among those things, we pick and choose. [. . .] In the big picture, that’s fine. No one has to save the world single-handedly.

But those of us who care about social justice have no excuse for not being aware of issues that don’t affect us directly, or for not taking people seriously when they tell us something that’s hidden behind the screen of our own privilege really is there. None of us has an excuse for wanting to maintain that privilege regardless of whom it hurts. And for my money, there is no better education in privilege for those who need one–and that includes all of us who have it, no matter how many times we’ve read “Unpacking the Invisible Knapsack”–than these heated conversations about the more subtle forms of racism, sexism, homophobia, transphobia, sizeism, ableism, what-have-you. Because that’s when it really comes out. That’s when people start making the “I don’t see it, so IT IS NOT THERE” arguments, and the “You people are just looking for things to get pissed about!” arguments. There’s a lot to be learned from those.

I don’t have to go looking for instances of sexism and sizeism to get pissed off about; I’m a fat woman, so they find me. But I do look for instances of other forms of bigotry, because in so many cases, if I don’t look, I won’t see them. And those of us with privilege need to look. So the problem with a Wesley Morris telling us certain instances of racism should be beneath our notice, or a Charlotte Allen telling us pretty much all of sexism should be, is that it gives those who really need to look a handy excuse not to. And it’s a hell of a lot easier to look for excuses not to care than to look at experiences outside our own.


But if you've got time on your hands, go read the whole article.
-Reileen
baptized with a perfect name
reileen: (general - strawberry)
All right, y'all. I don't care what end of the political spectrum you're from* - you should not spend 80%+ of your fanfiction profile writing about your political views. In great frothy detail. With big black bold font. And a political meme to end it (i.e., "Here's a really obnoxious and badly written chain letter poem thingy, and if you believe in it post it on your profile OR ELSE THE TERRORISTS WILL WIN OR ELSE YOU'LL HAVE BAD LUCK FOR THE REST OF YOUR LIFE!").

Yeah, I know. Freedom of speech and all that. Which means I have the freedom to rant about what I perceive as outright obnoxiousness. There's a line between "stating your beliefs" and "shouting your beliefs to every godsforsaken corner of the world with an Acme-caliber megaphone," and the line was veeerrry fine with this one. Myself, I try to keep the politicizing on my profiles to a minimum - "I'm pagan and liberal" - and have other people decide for themselves whether they want to engage me on that. As an artist**, though, it would be nice if my work could work as a common ground for people from all walks of life to have a productive dialogue about how to fix this broken world we live in.

Barring that, I just want to see well-written slash fanfic for my stuff.

-Reileen
I'm not your wrong direction, I'm not your free at last



*In the interest of full bias disclosure, I lean liberal on many issues, and this particular author was a conservative Christian. Her words, not mine.
**I'm including "writer" and "musician" in this, although I've been looking for a better umbrella term to describe what I do. "Artistiwrimusician" really doesn't roll off the tongue.
reileen: (general - strawberry)
From MSNBC: Born-again virgins claim to rewrite the past

Across the country, "revirginization" appears to be gaining steam. Spiritual efforts to reclaim virginity emerged back in the early 1990s and now, prompted by abstinence-only school courses taught to thousands of girls nationwide, and by religious teachers, there are reports of more and more young women like Watts attempting a sexual do-over. Other women are opting for a more radical route to reclaim their virginity: surgical replacement of the hymen, the small membrane that stretches from the walls of the vagina and that typically breaks when a woman first has intercourse — or for many other reasons, from tampon use to vigorous exercise.

In the last few years, say doctors who perform the surgery, a steady stream of patients, many motivated by the conflict between mores in this country versus their country of birth, or the country of their parents' birth, are interested. "The rate of inquiries is increasing," says Dr. Denise Baker, a Bradenton, Fla., surgeon who performs the procedure on about 100 women a year.
[emphasis mine]


Okay, look, I can get wanting to be a "spiritual virgin" again, sort of. I personally find the idea a little silly (barring instances of rape or sexual abuse), and this quote encapsulates one of the problems with the logic of "re-virginalizing":

“To some people, remakability is precisely what cheapens the thing in first place," Carpenter says. "Virginity is not special if you can be a virgin again.”


But come on now. If I physically lost my hymen, I would not want that fucker back again.

Of course, I'm speaking from the standpoint of a privileged, culturally Catholic middle-class girl in suburban Chicago. If you were in a situation where being able to physically prove you were a virgin was going to save your life, I can completely understand wanting to undergo the surgery, i.e.:

Alinsod’s typical patient may have been born and raised in the United States, but with significant family in Malaysia, Indonesia, Vietnam, Pakistan, India, the Middle East. Without evidence a new bride is a virgin, she risks being rejected, or, worse, the victim of an “honor killing.”


But something like this -

Once in awhile, Baker says, she’ll get a patient who just wants to give a present to her husband. “One patient of mine gave it to her husband as an anniversary gift," says Baker. "She was not a virgin when they got married so we re-attached her hymen to reproduce that experience.”


- seems completely ridiculous to me. If I'd already had sex prior to getting married and wanted to give my manslave a gift, I wouldn't want to recreate an uncomfortable, awkward situation for me - I'd want to give him lots of Hot, Wild Sex. (So says the aromantic asexual...)

Honestly, something's wrong with how we've been handling the concept of virginity. It's completely, totally fucked up for a million and one reasons, and I wish people would stop making such a big deal over remaining a virgin.* I can understand wanting to have some sort of way to mark the point at which one fully(?) becomes a sexual adult. But I don't see how or why that should translate into mass idolization of celibacy, either before or after the first time you have sex. This isn't like Ye Olden Tymes where remaining chaste until marriage was required so that we all would know who inherited what from whom. I don't see any real practical need anymore to place importance on remaining a virgin until marriage. That's not to say that choosing to abstain from sex until then is a bad choice, and certainly we shouldn't demonize anyone who decides to make this choice, for religious reasons or otherwise. But trumpeting the abstinence-only approach to sexuality as the only way to go, which is mostly based on an idolization of virginity, has been shown to not work (although you may want to check out some of the comments by people over at Dark Christianity with regards to some of the specific details of this particular study), and in fact may have contributed to rising teen pregnancy rates (although this article isn't very in-depth about the numbers and methodology by which they came by this information).** My point is, the idea of "re-virginalizing" as well as our common understanding of virginity in modern American times is just part of a larger problem of unhealthy attitudes towards sexuality which need to be fixed somehow.

(I will admit to struggling with my own personal hypocrisy over this issue of sex and virginity. Logically, I'm a pretty liberal person. Emotionally, I still get the visceral "omgslut!!!!11" reaction when I find out that people I know who are close to my age have had sex - a reaction which I blame on having gone to private Catholic schools for grammar school and high school. It probably also has something to do with the fact that I haven't had sex yet either. Hey, I'm workin' on it, aight?***)

I have a number of thoughts on the spazflailfest that is the concept of virginity, but I unfortunately do not have the talent to articulately verbalize them all in this entry, so instead I invite y'all to check out Hanne Blank's Virgin: The Untouched History. She explores various aspects of virginity, raising from the biological to the historical to the cultural. Or you can bug me about something in the comments. Talk to me, people!

-Reileen
yeah, I've been up and down your block



*Yes, I realize the possible irony in me saying this, seeing as my matron is Artemis, one of the three virgin goddesses of the Hellenic pantheon. However, the term "virgin" back then meant "a woman not beholden to any man," and did not have the sexual overtones that we modern folk attribute to our perception of the term. Regardless, I don't think that Artemis had/has much of a sex life, but it's really none of my business.
**Those crazy Freakanomists have gotten in on the whole abstinence-only sex ed thing, too. Did you know that abstinence-only sex education is like South Africa's driving test?
***Er, the "getting over my hypocrisy" stuff, not the "haven't gotten laid" yet part. Dirty jokes aside, I'm actually kind of a prude.
reileen: (Default)
Fred Clark over at Slacktivist always has great posts, with great commenters to match, and he recently posted an analysis of ABC's charity show "Extreme Makeover: Home Edition that looks at the significance of the show with regards to what that means for the idea of charity and the importance of material wealth in America - as well as showing that not all of these extreme makeovers have had a happy ending.

Daddykins liked to complain about why it was such-and-such family that got a new house, and not, you know, us or someone else. I always thought there was something off about his reaction, but Fred's post helped me verbalize what it was. It's a mixture of two things: the idea that the poor are somehow undeserving of being helped (has to do with the whole "American Dream" and pulling yourself up by your bootstraps, etc.), and this sense of jealousy, of "Why can't we have that? What makes them so special?"

Which then goes into another part of Fred's post, where he talks about the "misery inflation" that's been going on in the show recently. Basically, the shows' producers have been looking for increasingly more and more miserable families, like two girls with leukemia or things like that, in order to increase the pathos that viewers feel with the family on screen. It's meant as a way to fend off the envy that people like my dad may feel when watching the show.

Sorry I can't put together more insightful or coherent thoughts about this, but you all should check this out.

-Reileen
see, I'd have all the money in the world/if I was a wealthy girl
reileen: (general - strawberry)
So this guy tore apart a school bus to make a Victorian RV and ripped apart a $300 Dell monitor to make it match his steampunk keyboard.

I think we're going to have to add "steampunk" to my list of favorite aesthetics now, because, uh, hello awesomesauce.

If I ever make enough money to be able to really, really customize a living space, it's going to end up as this weird hodgepodge of cute Harajuku schoolgirl, sleek cyberpunk, Victoriana steampunk, mysterious gothic mansion, Renaissance fantasy, and ancient China and Japan. DON'T MAKE ME CHOOSE JUST ONE.

***

Can't seem to find my voter registration card. It's on my table somewhere, I'm just not sure exactly where considering that there's always a million and ten things on my table at any given time. I shall have to unravel this mystery soon, for the Illinois primaries are on February 5th and I must needs show my support for Barack Obama.

Speaking of Obama, I found out via another member at the VT forums that Vienna Teng started writing "Stray Italian Greyhound" not long after attending a Barack Obama rally: the song is "a reflection of being almost un-willingly inspired by hope and optimism sort of in spite of one's comfortable cynical, jaded attitude." Damn straight I can dig that!

***

No, I couldn't bring myself to watch Bush's State of the Union address last night. I did, however, dig up the full transcript today to read through it (there was a partial transcript on Yahoo!News by the AP that I read last night, though).

Reileen's Amateur Thotz, now in special bulleted list form!

  • I'm curious as to what Bush defines as "bloated" or "wasteful" programs.

  • I love how Bush mentions 9/11 but doesn't mention Hurricane Katrina. AGAIN.

  • I also love how Bush mentions that America is "leading the fight against global poverty" when our own economy is, from what little I can understand, going down the shitter.

  • I really, intensely dislike this paternalistic, jingoistic undercurrent that's running through this particular State of the Union. Apparently America is leading the fights against global poverty, global hunger, and disease, and it's also a "force of hope in the world because we are a compassionate people." Look, I understand that America is comparatively better-off and more powerful than many other countries (I'm possibly understating to leave room for error and shortsightedness), but making America out to be this sort of "firebringer" doesn't sit very well with me. It doesn't inspire me; it just makes me feel like there's something deceptive going on.

  • And a closing word directed at the Shrub himself: If you're going to keep going on and on about "trusting the people", you might want to repeal the Patriot Act. Yeah, that thing.


-Reileen
and all the static rolls around me
reileen: (general - strawberry)
87% Mike Gravel
82% Dennis Kucinich
75% Chris Dodd
73% John Edwards
73% Barack Obama
70% Hillary Clinton
70% Bill Richardson
69% Joe Biden
40% Rudy Giuliani
39% Ron Paul
32% John McCain
28% Mike Huckabee
27% Tom Tancredo
23% Mitt Romney
17% Fred Thompson
















2008 Presidential Candidate Matching Quiz

I haven't even heard of the first three candidates on that list. o_o;;

For what it's worth, unless he does something drastically unforgivable like being a closet Mudshipper, my vote's with Obama. (Will need to do more research though...although navigating politics for me is like navigating a rainforest in the dark with no moonlight while wearing 4-inch Jessica Simpson stiletto heels.)

-Reileen
I've made up my mind
reileen: (Default)
If I thought I could run to Japan to escape religious extremism...it looks like I'm dead wrong.

Soka Gakkai, a branch of Buddhism, is to Japan as the Religious Reich is to America, apparently. Both Soka Gakkai and the Religious Reich exhibit signs of being a dangerous cult, and are heavily affiliated with a prominent political party in their respective countries.

I'm a bit busy to look up more info at this moment, but this will definitely be something I'll check out later.

***

Also, I could kill the architect of this house who thought that placing the A/C vent on the floors of the upper rooms was a good idea. Thanks to that flash of brilliance, my room is perpetually steamy in the summer no matter how high we turn up the aircon. Hot air rises and cold air sinks, dumbass.

***

I think I feel like changing my general icons soon. I want more icons, but the ads make my LJ layout look fugly. :'(

***

Bush is the one who's spending over $6 billion on the war in Iraq and he's talking about "runaway government spending"?!

-Reileen
it's gettin' hot in herre, so take off all your clothes
reileen: (general - strawberry)
I am amused that my final paper assignment for econ, boiled down into its bare parts and translated into fandomese, is essentially me writing a 7-page self-insert RPF fic featuring five of the economists we studied this quarter. lolz. Thank the Gods it's not due 'til next Thursday, so I've got time to BS something. (Meanwhile, I have to cram on this art history paper. Whups.)

While we're on the subject of economics...if you read no other economics-related book in your life, I highly, highly recommend Banker to the Poor by Muhammad Yunus. I started the book, intending only to read the first three chapters for class that Monday...and ended up zipping through the entire book. It's readable, it's heartwarming, and it all actually makes sense.

Yunus is the founder of Grameen Bank, a bank that gives credit specifically to poor people (and primarily women, since according to Yunus they're the ones who suffer the most from poverty as well as the ones more likely to put extra funds towards care of the family) so that they can be self-employed and independent, able to live dignified lives. It was an idea started back in 1976, when as an impulse he loaned out $27 to forty-two stool makers in a rural village of Bangladesh. Whereas most economists seem to work from theory to practice, Yunus appears to take the opposite approach, first learning by doing, and then formulating theories based on his experiences. Both Yunus and the Grameen Bank won the Nobel Peace Prize in 2006, and it's well-deserved in my opinion.

-Reileen
all the riches, baby, bring what your love can bring
reileen: (general - strawberry)
From [livejournal.com profile] dark_christian: Dobson, Armageddon, and Our Government

A transcript from the article quoted within the comm entry reads as follows:

Rosenberg:...And given the events going on in our world today, people at the Pentagon, people at the CIA, people at the White House are asking to sit down and talk about these issues, to understand the Biblical perspective, because it is uncanny what is happening out there and it deserves some study.

Dobson: Joel, you are doing a great work. What you just mentioned of people in the Pentagon and the CIA are asking you for interepretations of what you see that allowed you to write these books. I think that's done by divine inspiration. And I appreciate it.

Wait. There are people in the Pentagon who are seriously talking about foreign policy stuff with someone who thinks that nuclear war is ordained by the Christian God? Yahweh, save me from your followers, please!

In other news, boy, do I ever need to do some serious spiritual and philosophical journeying. Because I am sick of feeling threatened by the littlest things. Things that are overly zealous and perhaps illogical to me, but ultimately harmless.

-Reileen
put on your lederhosen/and try not to step on little Pikachu
reileen: (Default)
Apparently the informational theme of the week at my dorm is sex ed, yeah? So we've got posters and shit all around the dorm building talking about safe sex and STDs and yadda et nauseam.

I walk into the cafeteria tonight to get dinner, and what do I see hanging on the walls?

Announcements about different sex ed events written on giant pieces of construction paper in the shape of giant condoms.*

I would take a picture to prove this if: 1) I weren't so lazy and 2) I was sure that I wouldn't die loling on the floor.

-Reileen
let's talk about you and me



*They even had different kinds! Normal, ribbed, female...
reileen: (Default)
Linked to from [livejournal.com profile] dark_christian: Christian pediatrician denies child service because parents are tattooed

A family is turned away by a local pediatrician, they say because of the way they look.

The doctor said he is just following his beliefs, creating a Christian atmosphere for his patients.

Tasha Childress said it’s discrimination.

She said Dr. Gary Merrill wouldn’t treat her daughter for an ear infection because Tasha, the mother, has tattoos.

Yes! Because that's totally Christian! There's a law in Leviticus that says you can't treat kids whose parents have tattoos, and one of the Ten Commandments is "Thou shalt not chew gum"! Let me tell you folks, this doctor is the epitome of Yeshua bar Yosef, because Jesus never went among people whom others considered skeevy and never consorted with those who could be deemed socially appalling and...oh wait.

I mean, shit, people. I don't care what the fuck the law says you have a right to do, but it is morally wrong to let a child suffer like that just because of your anal-retentive beliefs that don't even have feet of clay, especially if you're in the healing profession. And it's even more disturbing when you consider that the kid was denied an exam because of her parents. Yes, I am abusing italics. That's how pissed I am.

ETA: Okay, I've just re-read the article, and something's off here. The article mentions that there's another mother who has been treated by this doctor, and she says that she has tattoos and not a word was ever said about them. So we're missing a part of the story, it seems.

***

Triskaidekaphobia, take one. I make three noticeable mistakes at the beginning, middle, and end of the song. How convenient.

-Reileen
thirteen hells your death shall be, to freeze within the icy blaze
reileen: (Default)
I didn't even know that the State of the Union was on tonight until [livejournal.com profile] cmpriest made a rather acidic post about it. Curious and feeling guilty about never being up on current events, I Googled the transcript (it would be faster and easier than watching the whole thing, in more ways than one) and read through it.

Holy shit. All of that and he didn't mention Katrina even once. Wtf. I'm nowhere near as political and up-to-date on things as some of my peers (and even some of my juniors), but how the fuck can you think to comment on the "state of the union" and not mention the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina? I really think that says something about this administration. Also, the talk about balancing the federal budget within five years? How the fuck can you do that if you're planning on spending almost a trillion dollars on the military within the next two years? Seriously. Tell me.

In the words of [livejournal.com profile] cmpriest: "If [Bush] were a martial artist, he'd be Shit-Yu - and his shit-fu would be strong."

-Reileen
and now you're everybody's fool
reileen: (Default)
http://www.pamshouseblend.com/showDiary.do;jsessionid=3E5557D693C145AB79B41587F50C8FB8?diaryId=330

Lawmakers in Massachusetts, the only state where gay marriage is legal, voted Tuesday to allow a proposed constitutional amendment to move forward that would effectively ban the practice.


How the fuck did this get through?

Look, people. We allowed gay marriage to happen in Massachusetts, and contrary to many paranoid minds, nothing happened. I don't get it! I'm clearly missing something totally obvious here.*

Sometimes I hate America.

-Reileen
me and my baby on a February holiday



*Rhetorical statement.

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Reileen van Kaile

April 2010

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